Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein

Biography of Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein was born on 14 March 1879 at Ulm, in the Kingdom of Württemberg in the German Empire. His parents were Hermann Einstein, and Pauline Koch. He was a German-born theoretical physicist. He is the one who developed one of the two pillars of modern physics, the general theory of relativity together with quantum mechanics. Einstein’s work is also known for its inspiration on the values of science. He is notorious for his world’s most famous equation of mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2. In 1922, he received the Nobel Prize in Physics for his “services to theoretical physics”, particularly for his finding of the law of the photoelectric effect, a crucial step in the evolution of quantum theory.

Einstein believed that Newtonian mechanics was no longer enough to settle the laws of classical mechanics with the laws of the electromagnetic field near the beginning of his career. This belief led to the development of his different theory of relativity. However he realized that the principle of relativity could also be stretched to gravitational fields, and in 1916 with his following theory of gravitation, he published a paper on general relativity. He continuous dealing with complications of statistical mechanics and quantum theory, led to his justifications of particle theory and the motion of molecules. He also examined the thermal properties of light, this examination laid the foundation of the photon theory of light. Einstein used the general theory of relativity to model the large-scale structure of the universe in 1917.

When Adolf Hitler arose to power in 1933, Einstein was visiting the United States but being a Jewish he did not go back to Germany, although there he had been a professor at the Berlin Academy of Sciences. He instead settled in the U.S. and became an American citizen in the year 1940. He sanctioned a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt on the eve of World War II warning him about the possible development of “extremely powerful bombs of a new type” and suggested that the U.S. begin similar research, which ultimately led to the Manhattan Project. Einstein supported guarding the Allied forces, but really criticised the indication of using the newly discovered nuclear fission as a weapon. Later, Einstein along with the British philosopher Bertrand Russell signed the Russell–Einstein Manifesto. The manifesto emphasized the danger of nuclear weapons.

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein

Einstein has published more than 300 scientific papers along with over 150 non-scientific works. Universities and archives announced the release of Einstein’s papers which comprised of more than 30,000 unique documents on 5 December 2014. Due to Einstein’s intellectual achievements and originality, the word “Einstein” has been made synonymous with “genius”.

When did Albert Einstein die ?

Albert Einstein experienced internal bleeding caused by the rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm on 17 April 1955 which had previously been secured surgically by Rudolph Nissen in 1948. He died in Princeton Hospital early the next morning on 18 April 1955 at the age of 76, having continued to work until near the end as he took along with him in the hospital the draft of a speech he was preparing for a television appearance honouring the State of Israel’s seventh anniversary, but he did not live long enough to complete it.

The pathologist of Princeton Hospital, Thomas Stoltz Harvey, took out Einstein’s brain for preservation without the permission of his family, during the autopsy. He did so in belief that the neuroscience of the future will be able to discover what made Einstein so intelligent. Einstein’s remaining remains were cremated and his ashes were scattered at an undisclosed location.

Einstein was a zealous, committed antiracist. He was the member of National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in Princeton. There he campaigned for the civil rights of African Americans. Einstein considered racism America’s “worst disease,” seeing it as “handed down from one generation to the next.”

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